Tag Archives: history

Me, a friend & Detroit’s Dally in the Alley

Early Morning Sunlight

The alley where the Dally began 38 years ago.

It was 6:30 in the morning. The streetlights were still on. I parked my car up against a garage door in a timeworn alley paved with red brick. It was more like a small courtyard, with wooden balconies jutting out from the assortment of apartments built nearly a century ago. In the center of the space was a large, graffiti-covered dumpster. I poured myself some coffee from a thermos and awaited further instructions from a friend. I was there to vend in the annual Detroit event known as the Dally in the Alley. There was already a bustle of activity. People in pink shirts were directing vendors driving in. Tents were going up, and cars were being unloaded. Vendors are amazing people to me. They trudge to some outdoor festival with a truckload of stuff, arrange everything, and spend all day in the elements talking to all kinds of people, then teardown, re-load, and go home after a 17 hour shift. I find their commitment admirable.

I noticed a large hand-painted sign informing fairgoers that everyone in the neighborhood parks elsewhere for the day allowing the festival to completely take over. I smiled knowing the spirit of sharing still remained strong.

I knew this neighborhood well. I lived around the corner in the ‘80s. At that time it was known as the Cass Corridor. My friends were hippies and musicians. There was a co-op and a few art galleries. Not too much else. A decade ago the Corridor was renamed Midtown, and new enterprises keep popping up.

Except for an awkward, and brief, first-meet date a few years ago, I hadn’t been to the Dally since 1986. I remember the one and only stage not having speakers back then. The Jug Band was one of the featured acts, and they were acoustic. A girl named Sally played the accordion and a man named Ralph played a washboard. I remembered there were a couple of tables with goods for sale, and artists displayed their paintings. It was an event by and for the people of the neighborhood. Back then the population was rather sparse; it was an intimate affair.

All I knew about the Dally in the Alley 2015 was I had to be there at 6:30 in the morning to meet my long-time friend, Zana Smith – owner of the urban boutique Spectacles. I wondered how the day would unfold. I was curious to check it out from behind the scenes, but I knew I wouldn’t do what I was about to do for just anyone.

Zana at her store. That's my book.

Zana at her store. That’s my book.

I met Zana in 1986. I was working in an old fur-processing factory that had been converted to an indoor shopping mall connected to a newly built monorail loop. I walked to work to spend my day in what would become a failed experiment of retail stores downtown. Hudson’s was already closed and there weren’t very many businesses open. En route one day, I happened upon Zana’s store. We have remained friends ever since.

Spectacles is still located at 230 East Grand River, across from the new YMCA. Zana has kept her business going for 31 years. To me that is a feat among feats. Only a few stores, like Henry the Hatter, and Wolverine, have managed to maintain longevity in Detroit.

This year somebody bought the building in which Spectacles is housed. Eviction notices were sent out. Newspaper articles were published about the goings-on and the local community was in an uproar about the loss of a landmark business. A month later the owner requested Zana stay. After much ado, it turned out her store was just the kind they wanted in their building. But now the question was how to get the word out that Spectacles would remain.

I received a text from Zana a week before. It simply said: I’ve paid for a booth at the Dally. I knew she meant: Will you be there with me all day? I gulped. But I saw the brilliance of the PR, so I told myself if she could do it, I could do it, and volunteered. Zana scored a great spot just down from the Electronica Stage – perfect for us as we all like that music. The “us” included DJ/dancer Steve who works at Spectacles, and a new person I now call a friend- Corky. Having a booth at the Dally was his idea. He promised to help out and proved himself to be a man of his word. Three young entrepreneurs – Wink, Tracy, and Chinonye – shared Zana’s booth. Wink had photographs she had taken silkscreened onto shirts, Tracy sold purses, and Chinonye offered handmade apothecary. They exuded excitement and enticed all to share in their glee. It was a celebration of making things happen for one’s self.

The day was mellow for me. Most of the time I sat in a chair on the sidewalk behind our booth, drinking coffee, and eating my snacks. A constant stream of people walked down the street. Some came in to shop, say hello, or give a hug – old friends and new ones. At one point it looked like rain, but it passed.

SuperDre in the basement of the Detroit Historical Museum.

Sometime in the afternoon a DJ took the stage and I couldn’t help but stand up, grooving to the beats. I shouted to Corky: Who is this spinning? It’s great! He shouted back: Come on, let’s go! We ran to the stage. As we came up on it I saw a familiar ‘fro. It was SuperDre! I was so excited! I had met her the previous winter. She was spinning at a fundraiser in the basement of the Historical Museum, but her volume was turned way down. She and I connected both having lived on the West Coast and sharing the astrological sign of Taurus. Her live mix was kicking – seriously fabulous layers of rhythms.

When twilight came I moved to the front of the booth to sit on a stool and watch the ever-growing crowd walk by. A good friend of Zana’s stopped and offered to buy us dinner. I went with him to help bring it back. I was happy to be moving as it was a little chilly. At this point I had only ventured as far as the original location of the Dally in the Alley. The food stalls and the third stage beyond that were new to me. Then it was decided we would walk to Cass Café to get food instead. On the way over I was completely blown away by how big the Dally actually is. There were two more stages and what looked to be thousands of people who had come down for it. There was performance art, sculptures being created, and lots of goodies for sale. For blocks and blocks. I had no idea all this had been going on all day.

The Dally in the Alley is special, from its humble beginning literally in an alley to what I witnessed this past weekend. It is an event that has been put on for 38 years by an all-volunteer staff, from the planning to the garbage clean-up. Everyone does it because they want to. It is well-organized and has a great vibe. And whenever so many people from all walks of life, maneuver around each other, elbow-to-elbow, and everyone gets along and has fun, well, that is a beautiful thing to me.

Elizabeth Pilar is an awarding-winning short story writer from Detroit. Her debut book, A Blue Moon in China, was just published. It is the memoir of the two months she traveled through China in 1988 when she was 21 years old. Her editor is Christopher Ross.

You can buy my book here.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Detroit, Essay, Photos by me

Map of my trip through China

maptry777

hand-drawn map by elizabeth pilar 2014

Chronology:

A comfortable train out of Hong Kong into the port city of Guangzhou. From there the journey through the mainland began with an overnight boat ride up the Yi River and all day on a local bus across to Yangshuo. Departure was in early morning on a different boat to arrive in Guilin by the early afternoon. The first train adventure begins – and defines hard-seat-style – going west across the south via Guiyang to the city of Kunming in the providence called Yunnan. It took over 48 hours to arrive. Buses became the mode of travel for the next round of movement. Three days local-style to go further south to Jinghong and the Autonomous Region of Xishuangbanna. And back. Another two buses to Lijiang located in the foothills of the Himalayans Mountains. A couple more to another destination and back. The final bus ride was ten hours to a train station… somewhere. The second train adventure began with an overnight north to Chengdu, and 12 hours more to the city of Chongqing on the shores of the Yangtze River. Three days on a boat down to Wuhan. Less than 24 hours on a train north to Beijing. An overnight back down to Guangzhou. And then outward to Hong Kong.

A good way to look at the landmass of China – it’s slightly bigger than the United States of America.

###

 In the book, there are 18 black and white photographs I took while there; an index; and recommended reading, movies, and music from the book lists. I hand-drew the map.

Library Journal‘s verdict was that it’s a “nice addition to women’s studies readings as it chronicles the kind of travel undertaken with a tattered map and the recommendations of students met on trains.”

Feel free to contact me: elizabeth@elizabethpilar.com 

Buy A Blue Moon in China links here

Leave a comment

Filed under A Blue Moon in China, China, Writers

Reproductions of Six Antique Engravings of China

Show-room of a Lantern Merchant at Peking

Show-room of a Lantern Merchant at Peking

Harbor of Hong Kong

Harbor of Hong Kong

The Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China

A Street in Canton

A Street in Canton

Gardens of the Imperial Palace, Peking

Gardens of the Imperial Palace, Peking

Porcelain Tower, Nanking

Porcelain Tower, Nanking

All six were drawn by T. Allorn. Each had a different engraver: F. F. Walker, S. Bradshaw, J. Sand, W. H. Capone, J. B. Allen, H. Adler, in that order down from top. (I linked all the pictures to my website and uploaded bigger images of pictures.)

In my book A Blue Moon in China, there are 18 black and white photographs I took while there; an index; and recommended reading, movies, and music from the book lists. I hand-drew the map. Library Journal‘s verdict was that it’s a “nice addition to women’s studies readings as it chronicles the kind of travel undertaken with a tattered map and the recommendations of students met on trains.” Feel free to contact me: elizabeth@elizabethpilar.com  My website has lots of pictures: elizabethpilar.com If you want to read my story, I’d love for you to order it from your local bookstore and ask your library to add it to their collection. $18.99 softcover ISBN: 978-0-9904251-9-9

Leave a comment

Filed under A Blue Moon in China, Bucket List, China

There is No Such Thing as Bad Press.

PWreview

My first review in print.

It is in one of the big periodicals, Publisher’s Weekly, a journal that goes out to librarians so it is quite an honor to have ink in that publication. And a picture of the cover online. I am a debut author being published by an independent publishing company; it’s a slight chance to even be given a glance. (Thank you PW for taking the time and giving me some notice.)

A friend read the review to me over the phone.

I am in awe of the people of China, their longevity and contributions to civilization; their tenacity and bravery. I know there is a deep pride and love for their country. In a way, they have been celebrating their release from foreign rule since 1900. For a country with a continuous history since the first days of agriculture and a long list of inventions, less than a 150 years is hardly any time at all. It has been a century plus of tumult, to be sure. But there is something special in way of connection for a person born in China to China, an identity, a knowing who they are, a place where their spirit feels at home. I venture to guess that every dissident that has been exiled yearns to return to their homeland. My heart goes out to my Chinese peers, those who ran for their lives after the June Fourth Incident, those who haven’t been allowed to return, even for a visit, in 25 years.

Everyone I’ve met who has been to China and started studying anything about it, gets hooked in. The subject matter is deep, layers upon layers. It became a passion for me for years. I feel honored to share its history in my story.

http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-9904251-9-9

In the book, there are 18 black and white photographs I took while there; an index; and recommended reading, movies, and music from the book lists. I hand-drew the map.

Library Journal‘s verdict was that it’s a “nice addition to women’s studies readings as it chronicles the kind of travel undertaken with a tattered map and the recommendations of students met on trains.”

Feel free to contact me: elizabeth@elizabethpilar.com  My website has lots of pictures: elizabethpilar.com

If you want to read my story, I’d love for you to order it from your local bookstore and ask your library to add it to their collection. $18.99 softcover ISBN: 978-0-9904251-9-9

Leave a comment

Filed under A Blue Moon in China, China

J L Hudson’s in downtown Detroit: a collection of photographs & a little story

detroithudsonsfull hudsons When I was in grade school, my mother would take my little sister, my little brother, and me downtown to shop in the bargain basement of Hudson’s. It was the late 70s and the grand department store had seen better days. What was once celebrated as “the” place to shop was now faded in its glory. The building stood proud, defiant in its claim to fame. We entered the grand hallway and made our way downstairs. It was a bright place with bins full of clothes, shoes, coats, socks, and underwear. It was hot, crowded with women and children talking loudly. The subterranean room smelled of dust and the array of things to buy overwhelmed and confused me. After the ordeal of shopping was over, my mother would treat us to lunch on a floor with a broad view of the Detroit skyline. The old elevator had one of those metal gates that had to be manually pulled open and closed. Inside the restaurant was an aquarium with fish that was a wall between the dining rooms. It dominated the experience for me. There was also a wall of tiles with the design of ocean life and the rug was plush. (I just asked my mother about this memory of mine – she didn’t remember the fish. Was that somewhere else? Anyone know?) Hudson’s was known for its Maurice Salad. The dressing was top secret. (Years later, a lady who worked in the kitchen told me no one was allowed to take home any of the leftover food; it all had to be thrown away. She told me how frustrating and sad it was to see the waste, especially when the people who worked there would have been happy to take it home.) sideofhudsons100sidewithfence100 During Christmas time there was a Santa Claus, ready for his picture to be taken. graffitionhudsons100bookcadillacbuilding100

My mother would reminisce about the days when doorman wore sharp uniforms and would hold open the heavy door. Women ran the elevators. And the many floors were stocked full of quality goods. Hudson’s was known for its window displays and the artfully arranged glass counters.

I never knew that Detroit. Hudson’s closed in ’84. These photos were taken by me in 1988. Scrappers had broken in and stripped the building of all its value. After that there didn’t seem to be any reason for it to take up space, for it to be a blatant and constant reminder of a city fallen on hard times. The building was imploded and the rubble was cleared away, leaving an empty space like a scar upon the city’s landscape. hudsonsandcar100

###

All the photographs were taken by Elizabeth Pilar These photographs were taken upon my arrival back in Detroit after being gone a year. In my book, A Blue Moon in China, there are 18 black and white photographs I took while there; an index; and recommended reading, movies, and music from the book lists. I hand-drew the map. Library Journal‘s verdict was that it’s a “nice addition to women’s studies readings as it chronicles the kind of travel undertaken with a tattered map and the recommendations of students met on trains.” Feel free to contact me: elizabeth@elizabethpilar.com  My website has lots of pictures: elizabethpilar.com If you want to read my story, I’d love for you to order it from your local bookstore and ask your library to add it to their collection. $18.99 softcover ISBN: 978-0-9904251-9-9

Leave a comment

Filed under A Blue Moon in China, Detroit, From My Archives, Photos by me, Writers

My Portable Library

My Portable Library

A few of my books on China – part of my “portable library” I lug to my editor’s for inspiration, and to fact-check what I’ve written in my book.

In my book, A Blue Moon in China, there are 18 black and white photographs I took while there; an index; and recommended reading, movies, and music from the book lists. I hand-drew the map. Library Journal‘s verdict was that it’s a “nice addition to women’s studies readings as it chronicles the kind of travel undertaken with a tattered map and the recommendations of students met on trains.” Feel free to contact me: elizabeth@elizabethpilar.com  My website has lots of pictures: elizabethpilar.com If you want to read my story, I’d love for you to order it from your local bookstore and ask your library to add it to their collection. $18.99 softcover ISBN: 978-0-9904251-9-9

Leave a comment

May 5, 2014 · 4:01 pm

Man Outside the ForbiddenSome History of the Tiananmen Square Movement 1989

Image

Imperial Palace, Beijing, 1988. Elizabeth Pilar

Image

Forbidden City, Beijing, 1988. Elizabeth Pilar

The movement began with mourning the death of the strongest advocate for social reform the students had in the Communist Party, Hu Yaobang. He had taken the fall for student protests in 1986. The Party hard-liners denounced Hu’s “bourgeois -liberalism” as encouraging the students. He was retired from leadership, and the students lost their legal right to spontaneous demonstration, a right guaranteed by their Constitution.

Hu’s death on April 15th, 1989 marked the moment people would be allowed to gather in mourning and hang wreaths on the Monument of the People’s Heroes in Tiananmen Square. History was repeating itself. The students’ parents’ generation had mourned Zhou Enlai, who they had considered the most moderate voice in the Party.

That funeral became a podium for crying out against the atrocities of the Cultural Revolution. The event became known as the Tiananmen Incident of 1976 when the thousands of grieving, angry citizens were brutally beaten by truncheon-wielding police. Two years later, the Democracy Wall movement began spontaneously in Tiananman, and these same future parents had a voice with which to share in the lament. They saw their movement quashed; the leaders arrested. Now, they worried for their children’s welfare as they watched the new student movement of 1989 become the largest citizen demonstration in Chinese history, and thus, I would venture to guess, in the world.

Monument to the People's Heroes, China 1976. Peter J Griffiths http://www.griffopix.com

Monument to the People’s Heroes, China 1976. Peter J Griffiths http://www.griffopix.com

 ***********************************

The students sitting peacefully on Tiananmen Square in 1989 were the bright stars, the hope of the future for the Chinese people. Their achievement of college admission made them elite. They studied hard to get there. They wanted to make China a better place. They came from villages in the mountains, Autonomous Regions in the north, and from all over. It was the tradition of the Confucius Exam continued. In the Confucian tradition, the scholar’s place in society was to advise the rulers of China on matters of state.

But when the fresh students with stars in their eyes arrived on campus, they found the infrastructure in disrepair. It also soon became clear that their job prospects after graduation were dim, and their pay would be low. The lack of respect for intellectuals their parents had experienced during Mao’s regime seemed to be continuing into the Four Modernizations of Deng Xiaoping’s era of reform.

Did these contradictory realities cause a crisis of faith and a call to action for the generation raised on an open-door policy? They chose to march. They were very brave, determined, romantic, and naive.

Their paradigm came from a childhood interacting on the fringes with the West and its pop culture. Jan and Dean had toured several cities in 1986. The youth of the ‘80s had spent their high school years reading philosophy, science, and literature. They heard lectures by famous Chinese intellectuals preaching democracy and liberty. Central government propaganda and thought reform didn’t work to sway their minds toward the Party cause. The dogma they had been raised with was economic reform and an open-door policy. They had embraced that already; now they wanted something substantial. They wanted the Chinese Constitution to be honored. They wanted basic human rights.

womantiananmen100

ManWallMarch150

Man Outside the Forbidden City

edited by Christopher Ross

Leave a comment

Filed under China, Democracy Wall Movement, Essay, June Fourth Massacre, Tiananmen Square Massacre, Writers